Student's perception of effectiveness of a technology enhanced problem based learning environment in a Mechanical Engineering module

  • Sandeep Chowdhry School of Engineering, Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland, U.K.
Keywords: Problem based learning, education technology, instruction design

Abstract

The main aim of this research is to improve the use of education technology inproblem based learning (PBL) environment in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) module. The research study adoptedthe quantitative and qualitative methods. The study sample comprised of 79 students from Edinburgh Napier University (ENU), Scotland. Thedata gathering instrument comprised of two quantitative and one qualitative student’s feedback questionnaires. The results shows that education technology integration into the PBL environment according to the students learning needs,toprovide students with an opportunities to collaborate and build new knowledge in a PBL environment. Finally, the study proposed an improved design of the learning task. It implies the need for the teaching institution to provide academic staff development to support tutors in carrying out PBL and to encourage the use of tools like 3E-Framework that help academic staff to meaningfully incorporate technology into learning and teaching.

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References

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Published
2016-06-07
How to Cite
Sandeep Chowdhry. (2016). Student’s perception of effectiveness of a technology enhanced problem based learning environment in a Mechanical Engineering module. Journal on Today’s Ideas - Tomorrow’s Technologies, 4(1), 15-32. https://doi.org/10.15415/jotitt.2016.41002
Section
Articles